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  • American Psycho
    • American Psycho
    • Runtime:102 min
    • Release Date:2014-04-18 13:32:33
    • Director: Mary Harron
    • Genres: Crime, Drama, Thriller
    • Studio:
MOVIE REVIEW:American Psycho
Auhtor:

   

I never seen such a horrible movie as this one in all of my life,the
acting is terrible and has no continuity because it shows a sick
perverts fantasy about killing woman and torture and humiliation of
woman and Christian Bales character kills a homeless person and then
kicks his dog to death that was the beginning of the end for me to
watch this trash,Willem Dafoes character as the police detective is
another waste of time and none of this movie makes sense at all fantasy
or not,it shows how low the depths of Hollywood film making has
gone.all the DVD"s for this piece of garbage should be destroyed
immediately

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This is one very well done movie, that got greatly directed and acted
out by its impressive cast.

It's not really a movie that follows a clear main story but it instead
gives us a view in the head of a young, successful and handsome guy,
who seemingly has it all but behind his human mask actually is being an
emotionless, murderous psychopath, who starts executing his weird
fantasies during the nights. He more and more starts loosing it and
looses both his grip on reality and the ability to keep himself and his
urges under control. In all honesty, the best serial killer movies are
all like this and instead of picking a real storyline it focuses more
on the madness and its main character.

It's a pleasantly directed movie, that picks a more light approach,
rather than an heavy serious one and it takes us into the insane world
and mind of the main character. The movie doesn't ever really become an
odd or eccentric one but it still does a very good job at capturing the
right mood and atmosphere.

But it's also really definitely true that the movie and its characters
work out due to the acting. Christian Bale is really perfect and quite
amazing that this guy still hasn't been nominated for an Oscar,
considering all of the great roles he has played over the last couple
of years, this movie of course included. He's perfectly obsessive,
cocky and charming and he was for a huge part responsible for me liking
this movie as much as i did. But the movie also really has an
impressive supporting cast list. It aren't really the names that are
know by the big audience but it are names that are always respected and
liked by the experts. Not to sound nit-picky but I wasn't as pleased
with the casting of some of the female roles. Not because they're not
great actors but more because of their very plain looks. The character
of Bateman is supposed to be surrounded, admired and chased after by
the most beautiful women and I'm sorry but most women in this movie
just aren't that impressive looking. Perhaps it's due to the fact that
this is a movie that got directed by a female, so she might not have
had such an eye for it as a man would had. But this is about really the
only thing that slightly bothered me about this movie, which should
tell you something about how great it is.

It's really a movie that I liked watching because of how beautifully
insane it all got done.

9/10

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*** This review may contain spoilers ***

When it was published in 1991, Bret Easton Ellis' novel American Psycho
generated a level of hostility that's rare in the literary world. Ellis
was labeled a pornographer and misogynist for his scenes of brutal
violence and murder; and his book, a satire on 1980s greed and
consumerism, was misinterpreted and vilified by people who never read
it.

The story takes place in New York where Patrick Bateman, a wealthy,
good looking, and muscular guy, dedicates himself to a lifestyle of
material acquisition, trendy restaurants and designer labels. He has a
certain type of masculinity: physically perfect, financially
successful, popular among women and surrounded by all available luxury.
As tough as he seems on the outside, Bateman presents a poisoned and
impotent soul inside.

He works on Wall Street, in a world of great competition and ambition.
Overwhelmed by such a defected environment, Bateman directs his
tendencies through a very different way: hunger for murder. ''I like to
dissect girls'' he tells his colleagues during a lunch in a luxuries
restaurant. But it is not heard by anyone. No one listens or cares,
even the detective (Donald Kimball) who cannot stay focused on
Patrick's homicidal urges. Then it can be understood that all luxury;
cars, clothes, business cards, the building one lives in -everything
exists to make an impression in a display culture and to override the
other guy.

As we experience in the movie, Patrick Bateman is obsessed with his
body. He himself interprets his body the same way he interprets the
rest of the world: in a cold, disembodied glance in the mirrors that
surround him in the glassy, new urban landscape of Manhattan. As Bret
Ellis tries to interpret, ''the body muscles are useless in a world of
surfaces where the muscles are no longer connected to hard work that is
rooted to earth.''

When Patrick isn't perfecting his physique, performing an elaborate
ritual with facial products or making dinner reservations, he's dealing
with his other career -as a serial killer. A homeless man gets shot for
being a drag on society, a streetwalker gets impaled by a chain saw,
and an airy blonde model gets decapitated and put in Patrick's
refrigerator.

Bateman, who is devoid of any trace of human empathy and is not even
sure he has a personality of his own, has picked up a prostitute in his
limo and simultaneously called an escort service for a second blonde.
The women are clearly disturbed by Bateman's attitude; he's bossy,
self- involved, and prefers watching himself flexing his muscles in the
mirror to concentrating on the business at hand.

The slaughters wildly performed in the book (but not that much in the
movie) are metaphoric, judging by the mounting body count. The targets
are young women, mostly. After inviting them to his fancy house,
Patrick kills their senses slowly with a music recital, Huey Lewis
maybe. Then he literally murders them, reaching for an axe, chainsaw,
knife or whatever he believes necessary.

However, he returns to the office next day and moves perfectly. Yet
lately, he becomes worried. The emotions he feels – primarily greed and
disgust – threaten to overwhelm him. ''I think my mask of sanity is
about to slip'' he confesses. The ultimate insanity that Patrick will
go through at the end of the novel, is made clear here.

The movie leaves open a wide window of ambiguity. Whether Patrick
actually commits these acts or merely imagines them is never answered.
As uttering ''I simply not there'' we may suppose that he may be just
imagining the murders. And yet, it is not the point. The point is ''the
blunt satire that runs beneath American Psycho, the idea that Patrick
and his ilk are the metaphors for the unchecked hedonism and greed that
drove America in the fill-me-up '80s and remain active today. By
assuming a position of ultimate privilege, American Psycho suggests, a
culture also assumes the inferiority of others and seeks to destroy
them as Guthmann says.

It is the story of Patrick Bateman who is outwardly perfect every way
but inwardly filled with greed, contempt for the human race and
something even worse. This tale of Wall Street psychopath and his
deadly doings is presented with all manner of subtext, from its
criticism of late-Eighties shallowness and greed to that decade's
relentless pursuit of the body beautiful. In all its parts, American
Psycho embodies a postmodern vision of a world, devoid of spiritual
meaning in the midst of material abundance. The concepts like hunger,
lust, need are the symptoms of such a world. It is defined by an
obsession with surfaces, and a will to transcend the depths.

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